brinconvenient:

geekandmisandry:

I like how when there is a character who doesn’t mention being gay at all, but is declared gay by the writer, people act like that is a “realistic portrayal” of gay people because they aren’t “all about” being gay.

Like, have you met gay people? We talk about being gay all the time if we are out and it is safe to do so. Realistic my ass, Dumbledore would be asking McGonagall if he was too old to be considered a “bear” or if his huge beard made the difference, but ok. 

My annoyance with every token lgbtqia character ever is that they are always surrounded by straight people … like they don’t know one other fucking queer person? Shit, I’m queer as fuck and I can’t think of one straight person I’m not related to that I hang out with on anything like a regular basis. The only people I consistently make plans and time for is other lgbtqia folks.

You wanna talk about unbelievability? It’s that one lone queer person is totally cool and chill hanging out with only straight people and isn’t constantly rolling their eyes or correcting their shit.

summerchasingmermaids:

kaylapocalypse:

kaylapocalypse:

kaylapocalypse:

Anyway, if the new Harry Potter movie that is set in NEW YORK IN THE 1920s doesn’t have any black people in it (like the trailer suggests) I am legit going to throw my Harry Potter books in the trash and never look back.

I don’t care whose fault it is. The casting directors, the producers, j.k. herself. I don’t care. That level of disrespect, historical revisionism via white supremacist fantasy is not to be tolerated.

The Jazz Age.

With no black people.

The JAZZ AGE.

Do they have ANY idea how creepy it is that every single fantasy is a world without brown people?

That every magical wondrous place they can imagine, a dominant feature is that we have been scrubbed from every corner?

And where did we go? We’re we driven out? Did they kill us all? When one type of person is overwhelmingly missing there is always a reason.

And what reason will small children of color make up in their heads to answer such a question?

What little cloud will enter their mental sky?

image

@oneknightincamelot I promise I’m not dragging you, but I’m actually not talking about leads, I’m talking about environmental black people. Like black people in the background of that world. 

This is what Harlem looked like in the 1920s. 

image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image
image

This is what harlem was portrayed as in Fantastic Beasts

image
image
image
image
image

And I specifically looked for scenes with concentrated groups of background people. 

Its not the starring cast that was “whitewashed” its the ENTIRE ENVIRONMENT that was historically revised. Which is a much more dangerous lie. 

Also, this is specific to black people. While I am constantly hungry for more Asian representation and am happy anywhere I see it, Harlem and the Harlem Renaissance was a specifically an area and era infused with black people and black art.

Here is a documentary about it if you’re curious.

 Anyway even The Great Gatsby did a better job of quickly portraying our importance and style in the Jazz era, and it wasnt even a movie about black people– it was specifically about rich white people.

image

Honestly between this and the trash JK created based on Native American culture without actually talking with Native Americans to make sure it wasn’t offensive that will be used in the movie, I have zero interest in seeing it. It’s too white, too misinformed, and they’re putting fucking Johnny Depp, a known abuser in it. I have zero interest in supporting any of that.

That and Eddie seems to be portraying a Hufflepuff stereotype that looks as well written as Bella Swan from Twilight. It’s one thing when it was kids acting, but this guy has been nominated for a million awards and the trailers are just gross.

I prefer what fans wrote for an idea, that Newt is a black man coming to america, faces the shit show of racism compared to England, and goes on amazing adventures. THAT I’d watch. 

ar-ugh-orn:

Learning more about the wizarding world of Harry Potter is cool until it
becomes the wizarding world of cultural appropriation. These new houses
from the magic school in North America? Yeah they all get their names
and traits from indigenous culture and religion. J.K. Rowling has no
right to these narratives and no business encouraging non-native people
like myself to identify with the Thunderbird, Great Horned Serpent,
Wampus, or Pukwudgie.

stitchmediamix:

Fantastic Beasts & Invisible Diversity in the Harry Potter Series

For a body of media that seems fixated on different avenues of
oppression, the Harry Potter series is seriously lacking when it comes
to actual diversity and oppression that doesn’t revolve around magical
beings. Seriously, just about everything’s a metaphor for some form of
oppression or some facet of a marginalized identity.

If you’re looking for allegories about human rights and racism shown
through a lens of magical humans and magical species, cool. That’s what
you’re getting.

If you’re actually looking for nuanced interpretations of how race,
power, and privilege intersect and affect each other in a world of
magic, maybe look somewhere else.

J. K. Rowling’s world isn’t going to be it.

For more thoughts on the series’ lack of diversity and the convenient fiction of “organic” diversity in media, head on over to the main post!

Sadly, this is still super relevant considering that JKR puts more thought into fleshing out fictional creatures in her works than she does into the mere notion that N. America (especially the United States) isn’t the UK 2.0 –

Or you know… the idea that using actual religious and cultural symbols from Native American cultures is disrespectful. 

Fantastic Beasts & Invisible Diversity in the Harry Potter Series

For a body of media that seems fixated on different avenues of
oppression, the Harry Potter series is seriously lacking when it comes
to actual diversity and oppression that doesn’t revolve around magical
beings. Seriously, just about everything’s a metaphor for some form of
oppression or some facet of a marginalized identity.

If you’re looking for allegories about human rights and racism shown
through a lens of magical humans and magical species, cool. That’s what
you’re getting.

If you’re actually looking for nuanced interpretations of how race,
power, and privilege intersect and affect each other in a world of
magic, maybe look somewhere else.

J. K. Rowling’s world isn’t going to be it.

For more thoughts on the series’ lack of diversity and the convenient fiction of “organic” diversity in media, head on over to the main post!