Luke Cage – Looks Like A Cinnamon Roll…

Saying that physically powerful Black characters such as Luke Cage and American Gods‘ Shadow Moon (played by biracial Black actor Ricky Whittle) “look like they could kill you” prior to calling them cinnamon rolls seems harmless and endearing, but can be linked back to the fact that their bigness and their Blackness are what cause white audiences to view them as threats in the first place.

It’s only after these characters prove their value and their softness (usually in a way that appeals to whiteness), that they’re revered for cinnamon roll status.

But it’s rather clear why fandom does this.

This piece, the third in my “Looks like a Cinnamon Roll…” essay series, tackles the way fandom views Black bodies as inherently threatening and titillating. 

In this post, I talk about sexual racism in and out of fandom, stereotypes of Black masculinity in literature, and why saying that powerfully built Black characters “look like they could kill you” but are actually Cinnamon Rolls isn’t as sugar sweet as it seems. 

If you like what you read and want to support the creation of new content, feel free to support the Stitch via: Patreon | PayPal 

[Finished Draft] Luke Cage – Looks Like A Cinnamon Roll… | Zina on Patreon

I know that I’ve already gone and posted this once before, but I was reading some work on kink and race and it hit me that I should cover that aspect in further detail.  So that’s what I did. I added about 500 words on sexual objectification and double standards in shipping spaces. I also refrained from bringing up Mandingo OR Franzeska’s everything when it comes to handwaving away sexual racism. I feel proud of myself.

After this essay, I’m going to take a break from the Cinnamon Roll stuff unless I can find someone interested in writing for me about how fandom drops the ball with other (non-Black) male characters of color. (And if you all know anyone interested in writing about something like that as a person of color, hit me up.)

An updated version of the last essay I’m doing for the Cinnamon Rolls of Color series is up for Patrons at the $3 Tier. It’s primarily focused on the way fandom sees “big” black guys as both threatening and titillating. 

[Finished Draft] Luke Cage – Looks Like A Cinnamon Roll… | Zina on Patreon

Luke Cage and Claire Temple: Not Your Mammy Figures

Luke and Claire aren’t here for your inability to conceptualize them as full characters outside of the Mammy/Magical Negro archetypes and they certainly don’t owe this dollar bin Danny Rand a damn thing.

Fandom’s desire for them is basically to see them serve as Danny’s nanny. But here’s the thing: Danny isn’t a child. He’s my age or older and yet, fandom is treating him like he’s a kid to be parented by two black characters (one who doesn’t even know him).

The problem is that a lot of nonblack people honestly only believe that Black people only matter when they’re useful (when they’re doing some kind of labor) or performing for other’s entertainment.

If you like this kind of content, support the Stitch on: PayPal | Patreon

[Finished Draft] Luke Cage and Claire Temple: Not Your Mammy Figures | Zina on Patreon

Luke and Claire aren’t here for your inability to conceptualize them as full characters outside of the Mammy/Magical Negro archetypes and they certainly don’t owe dollar bin Danny Rand a damn thing.

Fandom’s desire for them is basically to see them serve as Danny’s nanny. But here’s the thing: Danny isn’t a child. He’s my age or older and yet, fandom is treating him like he’s a kid to be parented by two black characters (one who doesn’t even know him).

For early access to this post on fandom racism and the idea of Black people/characters needing to be useful to white characters, head on over to Patreon today!

[Finished Draft] Luke Cage and Claire Temple: Not Your Mammy Figures | Zina on Patreon